Why the Psychology of Color Is Useful When Choosing From Various Abstract Wallpapers


Abstract wallpapers are always excellent choices for contemporary art lovers and people who like dreaming away. Digital art has the power to create unexpected graphics that please the eye, and offer viewers a psychedelic visual experience. Computer generated fractals or just photographs taken from unusual perspectives can help people evade from their environments into a new, creative world of shape and color. When admiring abstract pictures, you can get the impression of an unreal experience, comparable to that of a dream, a fantasy or of an altered state of consciousness.

How do you choose your abstract desktop backgrounds? Some people are just impressed with the eerie feeling certain images give, some like to choose images depending on their mood, the day, the weather and so on. There are people who like to choose abstract images depending on their color and the effects that specific color has on the human brain. The psychology of color offers clues to the fact that different colors have different effects on people, and we could use color in a therapeutic way.

First of all, how do people perceive color? Actually, color is a subjective experience in our brains. Objects are perceived as having different colors depending on the frequency of the light they reflect. The cone cells in our eyes are specialized to perceive color and transmit the visual information to the brain.

Colors also differ when it comes to their cultural interpretations and their effects on people. For example, in Western cultures, black symbolizes death and mourning, while in the Korean culture, the color of death is white. The effects colors have on people are mostly similar in all cultures.

What is the effect of your favorite color on the human brain? Let’s have a look at what psychologists have to say about the power different colors have:

Red

Red is said to have a stimulating effect on people. Researchers found that red could affect people’s reactions, leading to more rapid movements and a greater force. This stimulating effect can also have negative consequences, like agitation or lack of concentration. Scientists found that exposing students to red leads to a poor performance on a test. So, if you plan to change your desktop wallpaper before an important exam, it might be a better idea to choose cool colors and avoid red.

Blue

Blue is a color that often induces calmness, relaxation, peace and serenity, because it can have the effect of lowering the pulse rate. Unlike red, blue stimulates creativity and has a positive influence on productivity. When you plan on working hard, choose blue abstract backgrounds for your computer, and you will be amazed of your own productivity. On the other side, blue can also create a sad, distant feeling.

Green

When you feel stressed, change your desktop background to a green abstract image. Green is said to relieve stress and help body healing. A color of nature, green creates a feeling of calm and tranquility. Researchers also found that green has a positive influence on people’s reading ability.

So next time you choose a background for your computer, make sure the dominant color matches your mood and purposes. Abstract wallpapers can calm you or stimulate you depending on their color.

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Source by Ivan Tokic

Art of Hokusai: Explore His Life and Legacy and Learn to Paint in His Unique Style

Art of Hokusai: Explore His Life and Legacy and Learn to Paint in His Unique Style

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Beautifully illustrated throughout, Art of Hokusai takes you through his life, his work, his inspirations, and his legacy. Katsushika Hokusai (1760-May 10, 1849) was a Japanese artist, ukiyo-e painter and printmaker of the Edo period. In his time he was Japan’s leading expert on Chinese painting.

Then, create your own masterpieces using Hokusai’s basic painting techniques as well as his unique color theory. Use helpful templates on perforated pages to transfer your favorite Hokusai paintings onto separate canvas or paper that are large enough to mount and frame. Learn to paint classic, traditional Asian art in the style of the master, Hokusai. This book is a lovely addition to any artist’s library.



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His Most Famous Illustration (The Peacock Skirt) – Aubrey Beardsley


English illustrator, caricaturist, and author Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (1872- 1898) was born in Brighton, Menton, France on August 21, 1872. The frontrunner of ‘Aestheticism’ and ‘Art Nouveau,’ Aubrey’s accentuation for erotic components is displayed in many of his drawings. The most daring and audacious representation could be seen in his famous illustrations Lysistrata, and Salome, especially “The Peacock Skirt.”

Beardsley’s art styles were phased, differentiated by his unique signatures, dedicated to each phase. For example, beginning with leaving artworks unsigned, the subsequent six years carried his peculiar signatures, while in the year 1891 and 1892, he accustomed his work with his initials A.V.B. Aubrey Beardsley belonged to the group of artists called ‘Art Nouveau.’ ‘Art Nouveau’ was a manner of art and architecture that reached its popularity in the twentieth century. The word ‘Art Nouveau’ is a French word, which means ‘New Art.’ ‘Art Nouveau’ usually exhibited dark and villainous pictures. The main theme of Aubrey Beardsley’s later works however, were erotic illustrations inspired by the Japanese ‘shunga’ (love making techniques, positions, heterosexual or homosexual behavior, and possibilities), history, and mythology. Aubrey Beardsley effected numerous illustrations for the magazines, and books as well. His most famous illustration was “The Peacock Skirt” for Oscar Wilde’s play ‘Salome.’

Oscar Wilde was a close and a beloved friend of Beardsley. Aubrey procreated “The Peacock Skirt” in 1894. The play Salome was first published in 1893 in French and the next year in English, to be performed eventually in Paris in 1896. In this illustration, the beautiful Salome, the daughter of Herod and Herodias, tries to lure the Syrian Captain of the guard. She uses her beauty for this act, so that the Captain can release the prisoner John the Baptist. At the end of the play, Salome kisses John’s head. As per the renowned myth, John the Baptist does not accept Salome’s love. Therefore, Salome uses her beauty and power to get John the Baptist executed.

“The Peacock Skirt” was a black and white illustration, created using pen and ink. This illustration was inspired from one of the works of James McNeil Whistler ‘The Princess from the Land of Porcelain.’ The black and white lines resembled the style commonly used by the Japanese artists. In this illustration, Salome and the Syrian Captain of the guard are exhibited facing each other. The image on the right side is wearing a long and full sleeves wrapper. The image on the left side of the illustration has his hair adorned with the legions of peacock feathers. He is wearing heavily embroidered apparel on his back. The embroidery is confined literally to the lowermost section of the apparel. On the extreme left side, a peacock’s pattern is also manifested.

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Source by Annette Labedzki

Daily Painting: Paint Small and Often To Become a More Creative, Productive, and Successful Artist

Daily Painting: Paint Small and Often To Become a More Creative, Productive, and Successful Artist

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A unique system for jump-starting artistic creativity, encouraging experimentation and growth, and increasing sales for artists of all levels, from novices to professionals.
 
Have you landed in a frustrating rut? Are you having trouble selling paintings in galleries, getting bogged down by projects you can’t seem to finish or abandon, or finding excuses to avoid working in the studio? Author Carol Marine knows exactly how you feel—she herself suffered from painter’s block, until she discovered “daily painting.” The idea is simple: do art (usually small) often (how often is up to you), and if you’d like, post and sell it online. Soon you’ll find that your block dissolves and you’re painting work you love—and more of it than you ever thought possible!

With her encouraging tone and useful exercises, Marine teaches you to:
-Master composition and value
-Become confident in any medium including oil painting, acrylic painting, watercolors, and other media
-Choose subjects wisely
-Stay fresh and loose
-Photograph, post, and sell your art online
-Become connected to the growing movement of daily painters around the worldWatson-Guptill



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How to Create a Reverse Painting on Glass


Introduction:

Glass is a non-absorbent painting support which does not allow paint to easily adhere to it – apart from through the paint’s own drying process.

For this reason the outlines of a subject painted on glass need to be simplified when applied to an extremely smooth glass surface. Simplifying a subject does not necessarily detract from the end result after the painting is completed and the final result can often have an appearance similar to that of naive art in relation to composition and form and a certain number of other details. Many artists may find that such simplification can actually be very appealing.

Working the paint or changing outlines without smudging the surrounding areas of undried paint may require some concentration in the beginning, as well as a certain amount of skill, but with patience and the development of their skills using this painting technique, artists will find that applying and mastering the use of glass as a support will become easier as time progresses.

MATERIALS REQUIRED FOR PAINTING ON GLASS

Glass

Choose clear unflawed glass (or plexiglass) in the shape and size you wish to use. In order to begin mastering the technique of reverse painting it is advised to choose smaller sizes to begin with.

Paints

It is important to use a paint that will adhere properly to the surface of the glass. Oil based paints or acrylics are often used for this reason.There are also opaque and transparent ceramic artist colours that have been especially manufactured for using on a non-absorbent surface. Metallic colours (eg. gold, silver or copper) can also be interesting to work with. There are an increasing number of new art products available today that may be suitable for painting on a non-absorbent surface such as glass.

Paintbrushes

To begin choose a selection of small or medium-sized paintbrushes with fine, flat and pointed tips. Larger brushes can be used for working on a larger scale. Artists can also use less conventional tools for applying paint if they wish, depending on the effects obtained through experimentation that may interest them.

A penholder

Used for outlines (if required) and finer details. It can be an advantage to use interchangeable nibs suitable for creating both thick and thin outlines.

Ink for creating outlines on glass

The inks used need to be suitable for applying to a non-absorbent surface such as glass. As an alternative paint can also be thinned down into a more liquid form and used for creating outlines in which case attention must be given to to creating the right mixture of fluidity and thickness.

A painting palette or something similar to mix your paint on.

A palette knife -(optional) for mixing paint.

Artists paint cleaner or thinner – used for cleaning or sometimes for thinning, and depending on whether oil based or water-based paints are used.

A paint-drying agent – (optional) For mixing with paints to help speed up the drying process

Paper towelling or some clean rags

A mirror – (optional) can be used to check the progress of your painting while you are continuing to work. Place the mirror in a position where it will reflect your artwork from its viewing side.

Cellotape – or a similar average-width sticking tape

An easel – (optional) to prop your work on

A glass-cleaning product

PREPARING THE GLASS

Choose a piece of clear glass in the dimensions you would like to work with and check carefully to make sure the glass is neither scratched nor flawed. It is worthwhile remembering that a flaw in the glass itself will often detract from the finished appearance of a painting and may be impossible to remove after the completion of your artwork.

The sheet of glass that is to become your artwork constitutes the following:

(1) The ‘painting side’ – which is the side you will be painting on.

(2) The ‘viewing side’ – which is the side you will be looking at (or through) as you progress with your work and after it has been completed.

To render the cutting edges of the glass safe take a length of cellotape that will correspond to the length of one edge. Apply it carefully along that length (ideally so that it is folded equally over each side of the glass).

Repeat this procedure for the other 3 glass edges. The edge of the cellotape will also help mark the outer limits of your artwork.

Clean the surface of the glass thoroughly with a glass-cleaning product. Use paper towelling or any cleaning material that will not leave dust or threads on your painting surface.

Store the glass where it will be safe. If placed between sheets of newspaper it will be protected from scratches and dust.

CREATING OUTLINES

Art products in liquid form that are suitable for creating outlines on glass may be readily available in some countries. Oil-based paint,water-based acrylic and ceramic paint can also be used for this purpose.In order to create fine lines these paints must sometimes be thinned down in order to use with a pen nib or similar line-drawing tool.

To prevent lines from being effaced too easily you can use a paint that is oil based for creating the outlines of your subject if the paint you will be applying over the top of it (after it has properly dried) is water based. Reverse this procedure if your outlines are created with a water-based paint.

Always use a liquid paint product that will provide the best adhesion possible to a glass surface.

Due to pen nibs clogging relatively easily, attention must be paid to cleaning the nibs regularly.

OUTLINE METHODS

Method 1.

If you have a steady hand you can use a freehand method for applying outlines directly onto the surface of the glass.

Method 2.

Use an original subject for your painting (e.g. a drawing) and place this under the glass then copy it onto the glass surface.

Method 3.

Place a layer of carbon-paper on top of the glass then place your drawing on top of the carbon paper and with a pointed object trace the subject onto the glass. Be careful not to damage your original image (the image being copied) when using a pointed object.

Method 4.

A tracing table can be used for creating outlines. This is a table with a sheet of clear glass inserted into the top and with an electric light source situated beneath it. For those who frequently need to trace their work a tracing table can be very practical and useful.

Method 5.

You can omit outlines altogether.

APPLYING THE PAINT

Most artists have a preference for how to work when creating an artwork. Once it has been decided whether to work on a table or use a table-easel or a standing easel, it will be necessary to view the artwork regularly from its observation side in order to see its progress.

Some artists simply take the glass in their hands and turn it around to look at it directly from the observation side. Others prefer to use a mirror placed directly opposite their working area so that they can observe their progress while they paint.

Mixing and blending

If you are blending colours always do so on a palette or similar flat object before applying them to the glass. If colours are not well blended or mixed the result will be a streaky appearance in the paint on the observation side of the glass.

Avoiding smudges

When creating a reverse painting on glass it is important to watch out for smudges or particles of dirt or dust that may accidentally be transferred onto unpainted areas of your artwork as you are progressing. Unless removed these may appear as flaws that will show when viewing the artwork from its observation side. If they are also inadvertently covered with a layer of paint removing them afterwards may become very messy and difficult. When lifting off any smudges always be careful not to damage outlines or other areas of paint you have already applied.

Applying the paint

Once the outlines of your subject have thoroughly dried you can begin to apply paint to fill in the remainder of your artwork. Begin with the smallest and most detailed or intricate areas first e.g. eyes, faces, small figures or objects etc – and always keep in mind that your artwork will be observed from the opposite side to the one your painting on and that you are painting in reverse and that therefore foregrounds precede backgrounds.

When applying the reverse painting method it is a good policy to reflect carefully on the sequence in which your painting will develop before beginning to apply your paint. This will create a methodical attitude that is essential for this particularly interesting but also intricate painting technique.

Wishing you many pleasant hours of reverse painting!

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Source by Mayanne Mackay

Materiality (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art)

Materiality (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art)

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Materiality has reappeared as a highly contested topic in recent art. Modernist criticism tended to privilege form over matter — considering material as the essentialized basis of medium specificity — and technically based approaches in art history reinforced connoisseurship through the science of artistic materials. But in order to engage critically with the meaning, for example, of hair in David Hammons’s installations, milk in the work of Dieter Roth, or latex in the sculptures of Eva Hesse, we need a very different set of methodological tools.

This anthology focuses on the moments when materials become willful actors and agents within artistic processes, entangling their audience in a web of connections. It investigates the role of materiality in art that attempts to expand notions of time, space, process, or participation. And it looks at the ways in which materials obstruct, disrupt, or interfere with social norms, emerging as impure formations and messy, unstable substances. It reexamines the notion of “dematerialization”; addresses materialist critiques of artistic production; surveys relationships between matter and bodies, from the hierarchies of gender to the abject and phobic; explores the vitality of substances; and addresses the concepts of intermateriality and transmateriality emerging in the hybrid zones of digital experimentation.

Artists surveyed include Georges Adéagbo, Carl Andre, Janine Antoni, Amy Balkin, Artur Barrio, Helen Chadwick, Mel Chin, Mark Dion, Jimmie Durham, Tessa Farmer, Chohreh Feyzdjou, Romuald Hazoumè, Pierre Huyghe, Ilya Kabakov, Mike Kelley, Anthony McCall, Teresa Margolles, Robert Morris, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Tino Sehgal, Shozo Shimamoto, Santiago Sierra, Robert Smithson, Simon Starling, Paul Thek, Paul Vanouse, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Kara Walker

Writers include Joseph D. Amato, Karen Barad, Judith Butler, Elizabeth Grosz, Georges Didi-Huberman, Natasha Eaton, Jens Hauser, Dieter Hoffmann-Axthelm, Tim Ingold, Wolfgang Kemp, Julia Kristeva, Esther Leslie, Jean-François Lyotard, Dietmar Rübel, Monika Wagner, Gillian Whiteley

Mit Pr



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Forbidden Images of Homosexual and Lesbian Sex in Shunga


Shunga, literally “Images of Spring”, is the generic term used to describe erotic prints, books, scrolls and paintings of Japan.

Prudery

Only recently (1990s) the study of shunga images depicting homosexual (male-male sex) and lesbian (female-female sex) acts of love have been commenced. This belated research of this “hidden domain” was caused by the official censorship in Japan and also because of the unease and prudery concerning the specific subject-matter in the past.

Male-male

Homosexuality, in Japanese called nansoku meaning ‘male love’, was not an uncommon phenomenon during the Edo (today’s Tokyo) period in Japan. In the early years of the Tokugawa regime (early 17th century) men greatly outnumbered women in Edo. There were very strict rules imposed by the government inspired by the loyal standards of Confucianism which excluded women to participate in any kind of work with the exception of household tasks. These regulations and the shortage of women can be seen as deciding factors for the huge amount of homosexual activities. The most characteristic feature of the depictions in shunga of male-male sex is the relation between the two involved “lovers”. The leading and dominant male with his shaven head is always the older one, this on the basis of seniority or higher social status, while the subjected passive partner was a pre-pubescent or pubescent boy or a young man depicted with a unshaven forelock. These young boys are often shown in female cloths and therefore easily mistaken for girls. They served as pages to high ranking samurai’s, monks, wealthy merchants or older servants and were most desired during their adolesence especially between the age of 15 and 17 years when the anus was still without hair. There are also several shunga designs on the theme of threesome sex depicting one man (always a young male) in the midst of sexual intercourse with a female partner while being taken from behind by an intruder. In most shunga images representing man/youth anal intercourse, the genitalia of the young man are often concealed focusing the attention of the viewer on the garment and elegant lines of the body.

Female Secrets

While there was a Japanese term for male-male (nanshoku) and male-female sex, joshoku or nyoshoku meaning ‘female love’, there was no such word to describe female-female sex or lesbianism. Most of the shunga’s I have come across as a dealer in the past 15 years regarding explicitly female concentrated designs (approx. 20 !) depicted either isolated women masturbating using her fingers or a harigata (artificial phallus/dildo) or two intimate women using this same sexual device. Hokusai (1760-1849), the most famous Ukiyo-e master designed two lesbian ehon (book) prints including one with two awabi (abalone) divers using a sea cucumber. Up to now the only shunga featuring this subject that has been described in literature is Eiri’s famous design from his oban sized series ‘Models of Calligraphy’ (Fumi no kiyogaki) published in 1801. In their book ‘Shunga, the Art of Love in Japan’ (1975) Tom and Mary Evans make an interesting comparison with Eiri’s (they attribute it to Eisho) shunga design and the paintings of the influential post-impressionist Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec:

“Whereas Toulouse-Lautrec concentrated on the emotional bond between the girls, and the sad emptiness of the way of life which thrust them into each other’s arms, Eisho (Eiri) was concerned with the physical details of their relationship. And while even such an open-minded artist as Lautrec felt that such details were more than could be reasonably presented to his public, for the Japanese they were the central feature of the design”. (Evans – ‘Shunga, the Art of Love in Japan’)

It must be emphasized that these images of lesbianism in shunga were the result of male fantasies, designed by men and intended for a male audience.

Profound View

Notwithstanding the embarrassment the Japanese at first felt for the representation of these suppressed themes within the shunga genre it’s exactly these particular images that provide a profound view into the cultural and historical background of their country during the Edo period.

Recommended Literature

‘Shunga, the Art of Love in Japan’ (1975) – Tom and Mary Evans

‘Sex and the Floating World’ (1999) – Timon Screech

‘Japanese Erotic Prints’ (2002) – Inge Klompmakers

‘Japanese Erotic Fantasies’ (2005) – C. Uhlenbeck and M. Winkel

Important Shunga Artists

Hishikawa Moronobu (? -1694)

Suzuki Harunobu (c.1725-1770)

Isoda Koryusai (1735-90)

Chokyosai Eiri (act. c.1789-1801)

Kitagawa Utamaro (1753 -1806)

Torii Kiyonaga (1752-1815)

Katsukawa Shuncho (act. c.1780s-early 1800s)

Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849)

Yanagawa Shigenobu (1787-1833)

Keisai Eisen (1790-1848)

Kikugawa Eizan (1787-1867)

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (1797-1861)

Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865)

Kawanabe Kyosai (1831-89)

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Source by Marijn Kruijff

Cortesi Home “Ronin” by Nicklas Gustafsson, Giclee Canvas Wall Art, 28″x40″

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Cortesi Home is proud to present “Ronin” by Nicklas Gustafsson. Digital illustration of a Japanese warrior. Nicklas Gustafsson is a graphic designer and a photographer from Stockholm, Sweden. Dimensions: 28″W x 1.25″L x 40″HGiclee artwork, printed on high quality archival grade canvas, Made in USA
Stretched and Framed, Ready to Hang
Dimensions: 28″W x 40″H x 1.25″ D
Officially Licensed Digital Print, Artist: Nicklas Gustafsson



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Darice 120-Piece Deluxe Art Set

Darice 120-Piece Deluxe Art Set

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This Arty Facts 120-Piece Set overflows with color and creativity. Look at the possibilities-markers, pencils, pastels, watercolors and plenty of accessories. All in a closeable, book-like case. A portable art studio to take with you wherever you go. Includes the following supplies: 24 markers, 24 crayons, 24 color pencils, 24 oil pastels, 12 watercolor cakes, 2 clips, 1 white watercolor tube and 1 of each: palette, paintbrush, drawing pencil, sharpener, eraser, ruler, sponge and scissors. Small parts, not for children under 3 years.120-Piece deluxe art set with lots of art supplies for drawing, painting and more.
Includes markers, pencils, pastels, watercolors and plenty of accessories
Provides excellent way for kids and adults to experiment with a variety of artistic media
All in a black, snap-shut portable case
Small parts, not for children under 3 years



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